Sunday, September 7, 2008

HUMAN NATURE BORROWED THOUGHT

When two or more groups of humans begin to be in contact with each other, each group is faced with a choice. They can decide to engage in destructive acts against each other for domination, which is costly; or the can develop a relationship of exchange and synthesis to a gain of both groups. Over time each of the choices will lead to a larger community where cultures begin to synthesize.

7 comments:

Benjamin Bush Jr. said...

Are you implying that there is no other choice available to the groups?

xtransoc said...

Nope, I'm just sketching thoughts. Their could be other choice that I haven't thought up yet, but the idea is general and only scetchy.

evan said...

which choice are you making over on the EC website?

xtransoc said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
xtransoc said...

Evan,

Most of the emergent "church" stuff isn't new. Most of what they complain about the Christian traditions that they are in, or claim to come out of, have brought up the same issues themselves. In general EMs (not all) are misrepresenting themselves. Top leaders of the movement have written as if they take a political neutral stance, then openly become political directly to a candidate, not just to a general idea. If an EM is going to create straw men to attack, then when I have time, and come in contact with it, I'll call them to account for what they are saying. Theology is blood sport sometimes - John the Baptist is a good example of this. I'm not going to sit around all day and say, "Jesus loves you" and leave it at that; I'll debate.

Benjamin Bush Jr. said...

"Reading Paul in Romans gives me gas."

Rutledge, I must confess. I'm still laughing. If I hadn't read your give and take on the other post of Reclaiming Paul, I would've thought you were just another EM type. So, keep it up.

By the way, I find it sad, but enlightening how easily Emerging advocates give up on a "conversation." Absolute Truth is rather difficult to overcome, isn't it?

evan said...

Rutledge,
Theology is indeed about blood but it is no sport. It's not about the blood you desire to spill, either.